April 15, 2024

Types

Canadian Designed furniture types start off at Mio’s Household furniture

Ignore cookie-cutter furniture. Mio's Home furnishings Fashions breaks the mildew, celebrating the special character and enduring quality of Canadian-manufactured items. This Sault Ste. Marie gem has put in decades curating a selection that demonstrates the artistry and dedication to excellence identified in homegrown models.

"We get satisfaction in fostering partnerships with Canadian brands,"  claims Audrey Overman, retail store manager. "When you shop at Mio's, you're finding a promise of top quality pieces and you might be supporting the devotion, skill, and innovation of craftspeople throughout the country."

Their showroom gives a curated array of hand picked designs. Here's a closer look at a few of their standout Canadian suppliers of upholstery and casegoods:

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  • Vogel by Chervin: For more than 50 percent a century, Vogel has been a chief in personalized home furnishings structure.  Their determination to meticulous craftsmanship is evident in each hand-created, fantastically tailor-made piece. From precisely engineered frames to flawless finishing specifics, Vogel delivers furnishings that embodies the two magnificence and remarkable high quality.
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  • Perri High-quality Furnishings: This spouse and children-owned organization provides many years of experience to the art of  upholstered household furniture. Their award-profitable artisans make each piece on a foundation of kiln-dried hardwood and resilient higher-carbon steel springs. With meticulous notice to element, which includes mitered and strengthened corners, each Perri creation is an financial investment in long lasting elegance.
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  • LeatherCraft: A Toronto-based mostly business, Leathercraft elevates leather home furnishings to an art type. Every piece showcases their dedication to high quality top-grain leather-based and sturdy hardwood frames. With award-profitable styles and a ongoing target on aesthetic innovation, LeatherCraft delivers household furniture that tends to make a statement of subtle luxurious.
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  • Durham Household furniture: Located near the Saugeen River, Durham Furnishings was founded in 1899 and is continue to making North America’s finest good wooden home furnishings. No matter what design you’re right after -standard, transitional or present-day- these exquisitely produced parts exude quality. From the specifics of dove-tail joints, comfortable closing doors & drawers to the sturdy & attractive finishes they are extended-standing parts you’ll be happy to possess.
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  • West Bros: This business has a pretty unique look & good quality to their reliable hardwood items. They are masters of joinery & showcasing the exclusive beauty of the purely natural grain of Canadian hardwood. It’s not only a satisfaction to appear at, but the luxurious complete is remarkable to contact. Due to the fact they use Canadian wooden for Canadian homes a 5 piece construction technique is employed to safeguard in opposition to wooden doorways warping and twisting. This system utilizes a ‘floating panel' design method in which just about every door is manufactured from 5 pieces that sort the frame (like a centre panel). This implies the door will increase and contract to alterations in climate, to stop binding and inflammation.
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"We deeply benefit the superior artistry, craftsmanship, ethical sourcing, and aim on longevity generally prioritized by homegrown models," explains Overman. "This aligns perfectly with our individual motivation to supplying extraordinary company, thoughtfully curated alternatives, and extensive-lasting worth to our Sault Ste. Marie community. It really is about bringing a piece of Canadian pleasure into our customers' households."

The workforce at Mio's prioritizes sturdy associations with equally their suppliers and their shoppers. This assures a seamless practical experience from collection to shipping, paired with personalized notice. "We choose the time to realize each individual customer's special requires and preferences," Overman emphasizes. "No matter whether you're seeking for a assertion piece or a total-dwelling refresh, we operate with you to discover Canadian-manufactured furnishings that sense really yours and replicate the high-quality you are worthy of."

Check out Mio's lively showroom at 261 Trunk Street to knowledge the most effective of Canadian craftsmanship combined with the welcoming heat of Sault Ste. Marie.

Arrive at them by telephone at 705-759-8183 or go on the web.

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16 Types of Furniture That Are Going Extinct

Retro Furniture

Photo: istockphoto.com

Have you ever come across a piece of furniture and wondered, “What is that?”

For better or worse, some once-useful furniture designs have outlived their original purposes. It’s not just antiques, it’s also some of our parents’ furniture, and let’s face it, some furniture that we used not too long ago. Let’s take a walk down memory lane and revisit some of the household appointments that are now obsolete.

1. Waterbeds

The waterbed had its heyday in the 1970s and ’80s and has been in steady decline ever since. Though waterbeds are comfortable they are heavy, difficult to move, and require electricity to regulate their thermostats. Another strike against them: Landlords and dormitories generally prohibit waterbeds because of the risk that they’ll leak. Memory foam is the latest trend in bedding, and waterbeds are going the way of the dodo.

RELATED: 11 Things Never to Keep in Your Bedroom

2. TV Stands

kids watching TV on a TV standkids watching TV on a TV stand

Photo: istockphoto.com

The large, bulky cabinets that house our televisions, digital recorders, and gaming consoles have gotten smaller and smaller, and they are about to disappear altogether. Today’s TVs are slimmer and can be mounted on walls to save space. And with all the digital streaming options available, few people even bother with a DVD player anymore. If you’re a fan of clutter-free design, consider nixing old-school TV stands from your family room.

RELATED: 9 Smarter Spots for the TV

3. CD Storage Racks

It’s not just the compact disc rack that’s a decor dinosaur—CD players are, too. Now that most people digitally download music, an entire family’s audio library can fit on a device the size of a wallet. There’s simply no need to clutter up the living room corner with this piece of furniture anymore.

RELATED: 18 Clever Storage Solutions You Can DIY for Free

4. Magazine Racks

The magazine rack was once a necessity for keeping newspapers and periodicals corralled, but now that most of the world has gone paperless and e-readers have become so popular, not many folks really need to clutter their bathrooms and living spaces with this item anymore. Consider repurposing your magazine rack into a landing zone for mail, or as storage for important documents.

RELATED: How to Declutter Your Home Once and For All

5. Grandfather Clocks

Bright living room with old fashioned couch and chairs, wooden coffee table, grand piano and antique oak grandfather clockBright living room with old fashioned couch and chairs, wooden coffee table, grand piano and antique oak grandfather clock

Photo: istockphoto.com

These days, grandfather clocks (and any other clocks, for that matter) are simply decorative. We have clocks on our ovens, microwaves, computers, and smartphones, so there’s no need to dedicate wall space to a timepiece. There are few grandfather clocks in homes now, and we wager that you’ll see even fewer in the future.

RELATED: 20 Retro Home Trends It’s Time to Revisit

6. Rolltop Desks

Rolltop DeskRolltop Desk

Photo: Wayfair

You don’t see many of these classics coming off the assembly line these days. While desks are still necessities for young and old alike, at least for now, the rolltop variety has proved bulky and prone to maintenance problems. Many tend to be better off with modern styles that are slimmer and more streamlined.

RELATED: 15 Easy Designs for a DIY Desk

7. Stereo Cabinets

Stereo CabinetStereo Cabinet

Photo: Etsy

The music industry has completely transformed in the last 20 years or so. Hulking cabinets for amplifiers, speakers, and two or three differently formatted players are just not necessary. Unless you’re a vinyl record enthusiast—and yes, there are more of you out there than there were a decade ago!—a dock and wireless speaker setup requires less than a square foot of space.

RELATED: Buyer’s Guide: The Best Turntables

8. China Hutches

China Cabinet in Dining RoomChina Cabinet in Dining Room

Photo: istockphoto.com

Many contemporary floor plans opt for offices or media rooms instead of the traditional dining room. Without a space for formal entertaining, and with more slow cookers replacing china on wedding registries, there’s really no need for an oversize cabinet to display fine dishware.

RELATED: 14 Ways to Pull Off a Double-Duty Dining Room

9. Futons

Gray FutonGray Futon

Photo: Wayfair

There’s still plenty of need to accommodate overnight guests, but there are much better (and more comfortable) ways to do so than the lumpy old futon. These frat-house standards have never been fashionable, and few folks over 20 years of age find them suitable to sleep on.

RELATED: Guests Staying Over? Here’s Where You’re Going to Put Them

10. Blanket Chests

Close up of a blanket chestClose up of a blanket chest

Photo: istockphoto.com

Older homes have a notorious dearth of closets. People didn’t have as much clothing to store as they do today, and what they did have was typically outsourced to wardrobes, trunks, and chests. That’s not the case in our modern era. Most people have linen closets with ample space for blankets and bedding, making these bulky builds a thing of the past.

RELATED: 25 Closet Storage Organization Ideas for Saving Space and Sanity

11. Telephone Stands

Telephone standTelephone stand

Photo: Wayfair

With more and more people forgoing a landline altogether, there’s no need for little tables to hold our telephones, answering machines, and phone books. Try a narrow console table instead to serve as a space-smart landing spot for little items.

RELATED: 20 Insanely Easy Ways to Build Your Own Furniture

12. Armoires

Pale French Blue and Copper Armoire/WardrobePale French Blue and Copper Armoire/Wardrobe

Photo: Etsy via CaseyAlvarezArt

These giant two-door cupboards used to be a great addition to a home, albeit imposing in smaller spaces. Originally built to store arms, armoires later transitioned to more of a wardrobe functionality, using the shelves and hanging space to store clothing or jewelry.

Many new home builds incorporate plenty of closet space, with walk-in or walk-through closets becoming increasingly popular. Built-in clothing storage eliminates the need to own an enormous armoire. However, some enjoy incorporating antique armoires into their decor, and others may still find them useful if living in an older home with insufficient closet space.

RELATED: What to Do When Your House Has No Closets

13. File Cabinets

Filing cabinet with one open drawerFiling cabinet with one open drawer

Photo: istockphoto.com

The world has gone online, minimizing our need to hold on to paper copies of receipts, tax documents, photos, and more. Instead of using valuable space in a home office for a cumbersome cabinet full of what are hopefully organized files, users can store this type of information digitally. From external drives to cloud-based storage, there are plenty of alternatives to file cabinets in which to store your important documents without it taking up storage space in your home.

RELATED: Home Inventory: Why You Need One (and How to Make One)

14. Vanity Tables

White vanity tableWhite vanity table

Photo: istockphoto.com

Vanity tables are a bedroom staple, often seen in shows and movies set in and around the 1920s and ‘30s. These tables, with an attached mirror, were used by both men and women to store items such as razors, oils, combs, cosmetics, perfumes, and more. It was a glamorous spot for getting ready, becoming a status symbol of elite society.

The advent of modern bathrooms helped make vanity tables less popular, thanks to the storage, lighting, and convenience of bathroom vanities.

RELATED: 9 Wildly Expensive Pieces of Furniture People Actually Buy

15. Lowboy Tables

Lowboy tables are the dressing tables that became the inspiration for vanity tables. Popular in the 18th century, these small dressing tables are short chests with two or three drawers and they have four or six long legs. A prominent item in bedrooms before tallboys and highboys came into fashion, lowboy tables had the versatility to be used as a table or a desk.

Though you can still find a lowboy table here and there, they are nowhere near as popular as they once were, and nowadays more likely to be used as a television stand.

RELATED: 10 New Uses for Old Dressers

16. Secretaire Bookcases

Secretaire BookcaseSecretaire Bookcase

Photo: istockphoto.com

Homes used to have mammoth pieces of heavy furniture called secretaire bookcases, or secretary bookshelves. Designed for efficient use of space, secretaire bookcases have three parts: a base of drawers, a convertible desk in the middle, and a bookcase on top (which usually has glass doors). The small desk section typically has a roll top or pull-out mechanism, often requiring the user to remove all their documents before attempting to close the desk.

These have declined in popularity for a few reasons: The advent of digital books renders some bookcases moot, those who work from home likely desire a more permanent workspace, and the size of these bookcases don’t easily fit in smaller dwellings.

RELATED: 16 New Things You Can Do with Old Furniture